Letter From The President Of The New York County Lawyers' Association

2014-01-21 13:34

To The Readers Of The Metropolitan Corporate Counsel:

It’s not always easy to choose an accredited Continuing Legal Education provider. Of course you want to satisfy your CLE requirements efficiently and economically. But when faced with a vast sea of offerings you also want to learn something useful, from the best thought leadership available. It’s important to find quality programs on relevant topics, presented by experts that fit into your budget and calendar.  And that means you have to know where to turn.

Whether or not you’re a member of the New York County Lawyer’s Association, you can tap into NYCLA’s efficient, economical thought leadership. An accredited provider of CLE in the New York and New Jersey, NYCLA educates and trains attorneys in all aspects of professional practice, law office management, skills, ethics and professionalism, with cutting-edge programs that keep pace with the changing needs of the legal profession. An unparalleled roster of experts from the bench, bar, government, academia, and related disciplines teach NYCLA’s programs and offer their insights, knowledge, tactics, and guidance to attendees.

The NYCLA CLE Institute both offers live instruction, online classes, and recorded programs. Our extensive selection of live programs — everything from Basic Legal Research to Insurance Implications of Hydrofracking — are presented at the Home of Law in Lower Manhattan.  You can also participate in programs online from the comfort of your home or office, or earn credit via the CLE Institute’s DVD/CD Audio Reference Library.

Don’t worry about snoozing through another CLE course! The programs offered by NYCLA feature interactive components to enhance skill building.  At How to Conduct a Deposition, for example, our panel of experts didn’t just dispense advice; the panelists also conducted an interactive mock deposition which highlighted how those concepts are put into practice. And our 6th Annual Art Litigation and Dispute Resolution Institute, which addressed many of the hot-button issues affecting the art world today, also included a live demonstration of a 3D printer to highlight the intellectual property issues associated with the new technology.

NYCLA programs also feature notable speakers and well-known authors who make learning come to life, like Jeffrey Toobin – New Yorker staff writer, attorney, CNN analyst and author — who discussed his book The Oath, and answered questions concerning the Obama White House and the Roberts Court before a sold out audience. NYCLA also welcomed new author Thomas Healy, Professor of Law at Seton Hall Law School, to speak about his book The Great Dissent — How Oliver Wendell Holmes Changed His Mind and Changed the History of Free Speech in America and lead an interactive dialog about Holmes’ role in the free speech movement.

Special events featuring notable attorneys, judges and public figures can also give you networking opportunities. After interacting with our distinguished faculty, as well as the many seasoned practitioners in attendance, you can make valuable contacts while earning CLE credit and brushing up on your skills. Our January event, So You Want to be an In-House Counsel: Searching, Evaluating, Transitioning and Developing the Necessary Skills to Get The Job, allowed attendees to expand their rolodexes while completing course work. And on April 5, in a special event for CLE attendees, NYCLA will offer the Top 10 Financial Concepts Attorneys Need to Know, followed by a buffet dinner and a Knicks game viewed from a private Lounge Level Suite—all at Madison Square Garden.

As always NYCLA members are entitled to preferred pricing on CLE courses. Don’t put off your CLE obligations!  Check out the wide array of upcoming courses at nycla.org and enroll in the programs that best fit your practice and your schedule. Feel free to tweet me at @nyclapres, or email at bmoses@maglaw.com, with feedback on our existing courses our suggestions for new ones.

Sincerely,

Barbara Moses