Letter From The President Of The New York County Lawyers’ Association

2012-08-15 10:19

 

To The Readers of The Metropolitan Corporate Counsel:

As a modern-day lawyer, it is not uncommon to take for granted all the technology we have at our fingertips. Of course, the practice of law has not always been so technologically advanced. When I first started practicing in 1983, electric typewriters were still in use. It was a few years before word processors and then computers became widely used. Most communications with clients and adversaries were made by telephone or by letter – either mailed or hand-delivered. Fax machines next became a part of everyday life, but utilized a special type of paper that curled up. I still remember when Federal Express came into being – what a breakthrough! And next came the emails and handheld devices that are so common today. Now we are beginning to use emerging technologies such as cloud computing. All of this technology has had a profound impact on eDiscovery – and we still have much to learn about both the technology and eDiscovery.

The New York County Lawyers’ Association is addressing some of the issues that technology has brought to our profession. If you’re interested in becoming more familiar with eDiscovery, I invite you to register for NYCLA’s September 27 CLE program, Overview of eDiscovery, where you can gain an understanding of the basic principles of eDiscovery and why it is so important. Learn what is discoverable, the duty to preserve, handling privileged data, admission, and objection to electronically stored information.

Meanwhile, those who are interested in learning more about video conference and how to build it into practice can register for the October 10 CLE program, Digital Video Conferencing: The Future of Legal Communications, to learn about the areas of legal practice that have grown to rely on video conferencing including the taking of depositions, communicating with clients via secure audio/visual systems, the courts’ use of video for violent offenders, and using video to increase capacity and efficiency.

Technological advances have made lawyers more available and also made us more responsive. But, these advances also have created an enormous amount of data that must be sifted through in many litigations. I hope you will tap into NYCLA to acquire more knowledge and feel better equipped to practice in your field using the ever-changing technology to which the legal community has access today.

Tweet me @NYCLAPres to share how you are using technology and what you would like to learn about it.

Sincerely,

Stewart D. Aaron